Lemuel Kurtz Green – 2014 Inductee

(On this date, August 17, 2014, the Osborne County Hall of Fame is pleased to present to the world the first of the five members of the new OCHF Class of 2014)

Adaline and Lemuel Green.
Husband and wife: Adaline and Lemuel Green.

Lemuel Kurtz Green was born November 1, 1860, at Stovers Town, Blair County, Pennsylvania.  The son of Phineas and Nancy (Kurtz) Green, he moved with his parents in 1877 to a farm near Bull City (now Alton), Kansas.

 

“A fervent Methodist with a solid work ethic, Lemuel attended the local school, and his first job aside from that of the home farm was that of workman in a saw mill and corn mill. In compensation he received his board and eleven dollars a month, but his pay was largely in cornmeal, sorghum molasses and cottonwood lumber. About the time that Lemuel engaged in this work his father needed a shovel to dig a well for the home farm, and as cash for the purchase was lacking, Lemuel approached Hiram Bull, who had been a distinguished union officer in the Civil War and who was then engaged in business in Bull City, the town he co-founded. Bull listened to the talk of Lemuel and readily agreed to extend him the requested credit in the purchase of the shovel.” – From a letter by Adaline Green to Orville Guttery, May 22, 1934.

 

Lemuel was then employed four years for William Bush at the Alton Roller Mill, located a mile south of Bull City on the South Fork Solomon River.

In 1882 Lemuel moved to Graham County, Kansas, where he claimed a homestead and a timber claim and lived in a sod house. The next year he married Adaline Dirstine in Osborne County.  They would raise two children, Ralph and Lawrence, to adulthood.

Lemuel proved up on his two claims and then traded them for a flour mill in Lenora, Kansas. Three years later he turned his interest in this mill over to his father and his brother, Irvin, and in 1890 returned to Bull City, now called Alton, and purchased the Alton mill from his former employer, William Bush. Lemuel operated this flour mill for the next 12 years, serving on the Alton city council as well as mayor.

 

Advertisement in the Alton Empire newspaper of October 2, 1890.
Advertisement in the Alton Empire newspaper of October 2, 1890.

 

Advertisement in the Alton Empire newspaper of October 15, 1891.
Advertisement in the Alton Empire newspaper of October 15, 1891.

 

“We are told that L. K. Green sold the old mill property, including the feed grinder, to Hollis Snyder and one of the Emrick’s, of Mt. Ayr. Alton Empire, January 23, 1902, Page 5.

 

“When L. K. Green, of Alton, after looking the state over with a view to erecting a large flouring mill, decided that Osborne, Kansas was the most desirable place, his wisdom was applauded by the businessmen of this city.  The reasons for his choice were obvious. In the center of a fine wheat producing section, with no flouring mill of any size close at hand, and with a railway company lending its cooperation, there is no great wonder at Mr. Green’s selection. After surmounting some difficulties in the way of securing a proper mill site, in which the citizens of Osborne gave generous financial aid, the Solomon Valley Milling Company was organized February 15, 1902, with the following officers: President, L. K. Green; secretary and treasurer, C. W. Landis; directors, F. W. Gaunt and S. J. Hibbs, of Alton, Allen Clark, L. K. Green and C. W. Landis . . .

“Upon the completion of the organization of the company, steps were immediately taken toward the erection of one of the finest flouring mills in this section. A short description of this mill, which is fast nearing a finished state, will prove of interest to the readers of this issue of the Farmer. The total ground dimensions of this building are 64 x 72 feet. The main part of the building is 32×56 feet, with three stories and a basement. The warehouse will have a capacity often minded, and withal a good business man, carloads of manufactured products, and he seems to have been fitted by nature the mill will have a wheat storage capacity of 30,000 bushels. The engine and boiler room will be in a detached stone building, thus lessening the danger from fire. The motive power will be furnished by a steel boiler, 5 x 16 feet in size, of a high pressure type and carrying 160 pounds working pressure. The engine is a Corliss compound condensing, with 130 horse power.  The mill will have a capacity of 200 barrels per day, and will be equipped with five wheat cleaners, nine stands of rolls, eight purifiers, three sieve bolting machines, and all the other necessary appliances . . .

“The company is putting in a full rye grinding outfit, and will make the manufacturing of rye flour a specialty. It expects also to do a large custom business, although of course its main dependence will be export trade. The product of this mill will be high patent flour of the very finest quality, strictly straight grade and a fancy baker’s grade. Work is being rapidly pushed on the building, and it is expected that it will be completed and in operation sometime between July 1 and 15. With an eye to business, the Missouri Pacific railway has already put in a switch 600 feet long for the exclusive use of this mill . . . Osborne County Farmer, May 15, 1902, Page 12.

 

Lemuel started experimenting with electricity by wiring his home and lighting it with electric current from the mill. He then installed electric lights, an early electric washing machine and even an unsuccessful electric-powered dishwasher.  Lemuel followed this by stringing wires for lighting homes within a mile of his mill at Osborne.  Convinced of the potential for electric power, he sold his flour milling operations in Osborne in 1908 and purchased the Concordia Electric Light Company for the princely sum of $21,500.  This company owned the H. M. Spalding hydroelectric plant on the Republican River. Lemuel soon installed transmission lines to serve several nearby towns. To help finance the system, he convinced local voters to approve bonds to build the transmission lines. His construction crew often included his two sons, Ralph and Lawrence.

Prior to Green’s purchase the company generated power only dawn to midnight and was closed on Sundays. Green bought power from another flour mill and began selling power to neighboring towns. Within a matter of years, L.K. Green & Sons Electric Light and Power was serving 22 communities in northern Kansas.

In 1916 Lemuel sold the Concordia plant for $550,000. With this cash he then bought the Reeder Light, Ice & Fuel Company in Pleasant Hill, Missouri and with his sons formed the Green Power & Light Company. Lemuel then built Baldwin Lake, which was used for hydroelectric power as well as provide water for the community.

In 1922, looking to expand with a generating plant at Clinton, Missouri, Lemuel took the company public under the name West Missouri Power Company. The company would expand through southwest Missouri.

After four years he sold this company to the Fitkin Group again, which merged with the Missouri Public Service Company.  Later this company became UtiliCorp, which later became Aquila, and now is part of Great Plains Energy, currently one of the largest utility companies in the world.

In his later years Lemuel retired to Escondido, California where he bought a 2,000-acre orange grove.

The Lemuel Green home in Escondido, California.
The Lemuel Green home in Escondido, California.
Another view of the Lemuel Green home.
Another view of the Lemuel Green home.

Lemuel Green passed away on July 5, 1930, in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, and was laid to rest in Forest Hill Cemetery in Kansas City.  He now joins his son Ralph Jerome Green in the Osborne County Hall of Fame.

The 1930 death certificate for Lemuel Green.
The 1930 death certificate for Lemuel Green.

 

SOURCES:  Alton Empire, January 23, 1902; Osborne County Farmer, May 15, 1902; Western Empire newspaper, June 13, 1895; Illuminating the Frontier, https://www.blackhillscorp.com/sites/default/files/bhc-ilwe-ch1.pdf; Aquila, http://www.wikipedia.org; Tales of a Town Named Bull City, Orville Guttery & edited by Von Rothenberger, Ad Astra Publishing, 2011); Bliss Van Gundy, “Osborne County Pioneers”, Osborne County Farmer, April 15, 1971.

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Garry G. Sigle – 2013 Inductee

(On this date, October 6, 2013, the Osborne County Hall of Fame is pleased to present to the world for the first time anywhere the second of the five members of the new OCHF Class of 2013)

Garry_Sigle_5x7_300dpiGarry G. Sigle was born in Russell, Russell County, Kansas, on October 28, 1956.  His parents were Richard and Evea Jane (Applegate) Sigle.  Garry was the youngest of five children.  Arris, Donna, Larry and Scott are his siblings.  Richard Sigle farmed 17 miles south and 5 miles east of Osborne, Kansas, near the Cheyenne United Methodist Church in Jackson Township of Osborne County, Kansas.  Evea Jane taught 5th grade at Osborne Elementary from 1962 until 1978.  Garry grew up working with his dad and brothers on the family farm throughout his grade school and high school years and even returned during the summers of college to help on the farm.

Garry played summer league baseball from 5th grade on and played junior high football, basketball and track & field.  At Osborne High School he participated in cross-country, basketball and track & field lettering in cross-country four years, basketball one and track & field 3 years.  In cross-country his highest individual finish was 3rd his senior year at the state meet.  In track & field he was the Northern Kansas League champion in the mile and 2-mile his senior year, and was the state champion in the indoor mile & outdoor mile and in the 2-mile, setting school records in both (4:24.1 and 9:33.1).  Both are still the state records for those respective events.

Garry then attended Fort Hays State University (FHSU) on a cross-country and track & field scholarship, majoring in Industrial Arts.

Fort Hays State University sports awards:

  • Four-Time NAIA All-American, twice in cross-country (12th , 1975 and 11th , 1977) and twice in indoor track & field (2nd in 2-mile, 1976, 2nd in 2-mile, 1978)
  • Was an Outdoor Track & Field Honorable mention All-American (5th in 10,000 meters, 1978)
  • Earned the Busch Gross award as the Fort Hays State University outstanding senior athlete, 1978
  • Inducted into the Tiger Sports Hall of Fame, 2008

Prior to his senior year, Garry married Linda Samuelson.  Upon graduation from FHSU, Garry was hired to be the industrial arts (woodworking/drafting) instructor at Riley County High School, where he stayed for 33 years.  He was also the head cross-country and head track & field coach.  In addition to his duties as a teacher/coach, he was also the Huddle Coach for the Riley County Fellowship of Christian Athletes for 29 years.  In 2011 Garry was inducted into the Kansas Fellowship of Christian Athletes Coaches Hall of Fame.

While at Riley County, Garry was named the Manhattan Area Walmart Teacher of the Year in 1998.  His coaching resumé includes 12 team state championships.  Seven of those have come in girls cross-country, three in boys cross-country and one each in girls track & field and boys track & field.  He has many top three team finishes at the state meet in both sports.  Garry has coached ten girls and seven boys to individual state titles in cross-country.  He has coached 33 boys and 52 girls to all-state honors (top 20 individual finishes at the state meet).  His cross-country teams have won 23 boys and 22 girls league championships.  In track & field, Riley County has had 28 boys and 28 girls win individual state championships and have had 112 boys and 113 girls earn all-state status (top 7 finishes in an event at the state track & field meet).  To finish his career, Coach Sigle had, for 17 consecutive years, at least one Riley County athlete who was an individual state champion at the KSHSAA Track & Field state meet.  Garry served as the chairman of cross-country for the Kansas Coaches Association from 1997 to 2008 and served as the President of the Kansas Cross-Country and Track & Field Coaches Association from 1996-2004.  He was the founder, editor and publisher of the Kansas Cross-Country Coaches Rankings, which he started in 1982 and continued until he retired in 2011.  In 2012 Garry was inducted into the Kansas State High School Activities Association Hall of Fame at the state track and field meet in Wichita.

Upon retirement from USD 378, Riley County in May, 2011, Garry was hired, starting in June, 2011, to be the Executive Director for the Kansas Association of American Educators.  That organization is a non-union professional teachers association.  He continues in that position today.

Garry has been married to his wife Linda for 36 years and together they have three sons:  Ben, his wife Cheryl and three grandchildren (Damon, Haley and Braden), who live in Manhattan; Luke and his wife Leah, who reside in Nashville, Tennessee; and Tim and his wife Lana, who live in Manhattan.

Garry has had many of his athletes move on to collegiate athletics including all three of his sons.  Ben Sigle was a multiple state champion while at Riley County and still holds the distinction of being the only freshman boy in Kansas history to ever win an individual state cross-country championship.  He is one of only a handful of those who won 3 state cross-country titles (missing his sophomore year with an injury when he placed 5th).  Ben went on to win 5 outdoor track & field individual titles in the distances.  He ran for Oklahoma State University and was All-Big 12 there.  Luke Sigle ran for Butler County Junior College and Oklahoma State University while Tim Sigle competed collegiately in golf at Cowley County Junior College.

Other former athletes include Jon McGraw who played football for Kansas State and professionally with the Detroit Lions, New York Jets and Kansas City Chiefs.  Jon was a state champion triple jumper and still holds the Kansas 3A state record at 47’ 6 ¾”.  Amy Mortimer was the state champion in cross-country all four years and won 9 individual distance event state championships in track and field.  Amy, during her senior year, ran the fastest mile for a female in the United States, running it in 4:42.4!  She went on to be a multiple All-American at Kansas State and finished third at the US National track & field meet in the 1500M in early 2000s.  Jordy Nelson was a multiple state champion in track & field but was better known as a Kansas State University wide receiver and now plays for the Green Bay Packers.  Jordy owns 3A state track & field records in the 100 (10.63 FAT) and 200 (21.64 FAT).

These are just a few of the outstanding athletes Garry had the opportunity to coach.  There were many, many others too numerous to mention.

*  *  *  *  *

Garry Sigle – Professional Resume:

Education

  • Licensed Private Pilot – Manhattan, Kansas 2003
  • TAC Level II Coaching School (Throws) – Provo, Utah 1992
  • TAC Level I Coaching School – Grinnell, Iowa 1988
  • M.S. in Physical Education, Kansas State University 1982
  • B.S. in Industrial Arts, Fort Hays State University 1978
  • High School Diploma, Osborne High School 1974

 Athletic Achievements

Fort Hays State University: Hays, Kansas 1974-1978

  • NAIA All-American
  • Cross Country – 1975 (12th), 1977 (11th)
  • Indoor Track 2-Mile – 1976 (2nd), 1978 (2nd)
    • NAIA All-American Honorable Mention
    • Outdoor Track 10,000 meters – 1978 (5th)
    • Busch Gross Award Winner
      • Outstanding Senior Athlete – 1978
      • CSIC Champion
      • Outdoor Track 3 mile – 1976, 1978
        • CSIC All-Conference Honors
        • Cross Country 1974 (8th), 1975 (6th)
        • 1976 (4th), 1977 (3rd)
          • Tiger Sports Hall of Fame – October, 2008

Osborne High School: Osborne, Kansas 1970-1974

  • KSHSAA Track & Field Champion
    • Indoor Track 1 mile – 1974
    • Outdoor Track 1 mile & 2 mile – 1974
    • All-State Cross Country
      • 1972 (11th), 1973 (3rd)

Kansas Fellowship of Christian Athletes:

  • Coaches Hall of Fame – April, 2011

Riley County High School: Riley, KS

  • The School District named the track the Garry Sigle Track – May 4, 2011

Kansas State High School Activities Association:

  • Induction into the KSHSAA Hall of Fame – May, 2012

 Professional Experience

Kansas Association of American Educators: Executive Director, June, 2011 to present

Riley County High School: Riley, Kansas 1978 to 2011

  • Industrial Education Instructor: Woodworking & Drafting/Computer Aided Drafting
  • Head Teacher: 2006 to 2011
  • Block Schedule Seminar Committee Chairperson: 1997 to 2011
  • Head Cross Country Coach: Boys 1979 to 2011, Girls 1981 to 2011
  • Meet Director: Invitational, Regional
  • Head Track & Field Coach: Boys and Girls 1982 to 2011
  • Meet Director: Quadrangulars, Invitationals, League, Regional, AAU
  • Head Basketball Coach: Girls 1980 to 1982
  • Assistant Track & Field Coach: 1979 to 1981
  • Assistant Junior High Basketball Coach: Boys 1978 to 1980

City of Riley: Riley, Kansas Summer 2001, Summer 2002

  • Pool Manager

KSHSAA: 1978 to 1993

  • Certified Basketball Official

Coaching Achievements

Cross Country

32  years Boys Head Coach, 29 years Girls Head Coach

6 years as coach of the Blue Valley athletes – 2004-2010

State Team Championships: Boys = 3, Girls = 7

State Individual Champions: Riley County Boys = 6, Girls = 9

                                                           Blue Valley Boys = 1, Girls = 1

State Top Six Team Finishes: Boys = 15, Girls = 19

All-State Individuals: Riley County Boys = 33, Girls = 52

Blue Valley Boys = 4, Girls = 2

Regional Team Championships: Boys = 10, Girls = 14

Regional Team Runners-up: Boys = 9, Girls = 5

League Team Championships: Boys = 23, Girls = 22

League Individual Champions: Riley County Boys = 19, Girls = 23

Blue Valley Boys = 2, Girls = 1

Track & Field

30 years Head Coach, 3 years Assistant Coach

State Team Championships: Boys = 1, Girls = 1

State Team Runners-Up: Boys = 2, Girls = 3

State Top Ten Team Finishes: Boys = 14, Girls = 17

State Individual Event Champions: Boys = 28, Girls = 28

All-State Performers: Boys = 112, Girls = 113

Regional Team Championships: Boys = 2, Girls = 7

Regional Team Runners-up: Boys = 7, Girls = 1

League Team Championships: Boys = 13, Girls = 10

17 consecutive years with at least one individual state Track & Field Champion – 1995 to 2011

Professional Honors and Achievements

  • Head Cross Country Coach for Down Under Sports (Missouri) to Australia and Hawaii – Summer 2008
  • Head Track & Field Coach for Down Under Sports (Kansas/Missouri) to Australia and Hawaii – Summer, 2009, 2010, 2011
  • Distance Coach for International Sports Tours to Scotland, United Kingdom, France and Switzerland – Summer 2000
  • Kansas Coaches Association Cross Country Chairman for the state of Kansas: 1997 to 2008
  • Kansas Cross Country and Track & Field Coaches Association Class 3A Girls Cross Country Coach of the Year: 2005
  • Finalist for National Federation of Interscholastic Coaches Association National Girls Cross Country Coach of the Year – 2011
  • National Federation of Interscholastic Coaches Association Section 5 Girls Cross Country Coach of the Year: 2010
  • National Federation of Interscholastic Coaches Association Section 5 Girls Track & Field Coach of the Year: 1999
  • Kansas Coaches Association Girls Track & Field Coach of the Year: 1998
  • Kansas Coaches Association Girls Cross Country Coach of the Year: 1992, 2009
  • Kansas Cross Country and Track & Field Coaches Association President: 1996 to 2004
  • Kansas Cross Country and Track & Field Coaches Association Secretary: 1986 to 1996
  • Wal-Mart Manhattan Area Teacher of the Year: 1998
  • Founder, Editor and Publisher of Kansas Cross Country Coaches Rankings: 1982 to 2010
  • Region 8 AAU Track & Field Championships Head Field Event Referee: 2000, 2002
  • NJCAA National Indoor Track & Field Championships Head Field Event Referee: 1991 to 1994
  • Kansas All Star Track & Field Meet Coach: 1988, 1989
  • Race Director of Riley Five & One: 1983 to 1987, 1992
  • Race Director of Bridge to ‘Burg 10K: 1980 to 1987

 Professional Presentations

  • 2013 – Testified at Kansas Senate Education Committee Hearing
  • 2013 – Testified at Kansas House Education Committee Hearing
  • 2011 – Riley County High School Graduation Speaker
  • 2011 – Testified at Kansas House Federal and State Affairs Committee
  • 2008 – Butler County Comm. College XC Coaching Clinic Speaker
  • 2007 – Riley County High School Graduation Speaker
  • 2006 – Wichita State University Track & Field Clinic
  • 2005 – KSHSAA Coaching School Cross Country Speaker
  • 2005 – KCCTFCA Track & Field Coaching Clinic
  • 2004 – Emporia State University Track & Field Coaching Clinic Panelist
  • 2003 – Brown Mackie Championship Basketball Clinic Speaker
  • 2002 – Emporia State University Track & Field Coaching Clinic Speaker
  • 1998 – Fort Hays State University Track & Field Coaching Clinic Speaker
  • 1997 – KSHSAA Coaching School Track & Field Speaker
  • 1991 – Emporia State University Track & Field Coaching Clinic Speaker
  • 1985 – Bethany College Track & Field Clinic Speaker
  • 1983 – K.C. Harmon Track & Field Clinic Panelist

Leadership Experience

  • KSHSAA Track & Field Rules Interpreter: 2004 to 2010
  • KCCTFCA Coaches Clinic Coordinator: 2003, 2004, 2005
  • Fellowship of Christian Athletes Huddle Coach: 1979 to 2007
  • Fellowship of Christian Athletes State Conference Athletic Director: 1995 to 2003
  • Association of American Educators Member: 1995 to present
  • Westview Community Church Local Board of Administration: 1989 to 1992, 1996 to 1997, 2008 to 2011
  • Fellowship of Christian Athletes National Coaches Camp Athletic Director: 1991
  • Fellowship of Christian Athletes National Running Camp Staff: 1986
  • NASA Teacher in Space Applicant: 1985
  • Walsburg Lutheran Church Councilman: 1981 to 1985

Articles Published

  • Minimum Requirements for Interscholastic Coaches”, Journal of Physical Education and Recreation, Noble and Sigle, November/December 1980
  • Cross Country Training”, Green Light Sports, Sigle, October 1997
Legendary Hall of Fame track coach Alex Francis with Garry at Fort Hays State University.
Legendary Hall of Fame track coach Alex Francis with Garry at Fort Hays State University.
Garry Sigle as a Fort Hays  State University runner.
Garry Sigle as a Fort Hays State University runner.
The Sigle family at the KU Relays in 2002.
The Sigle family at the KU Relays in 2002.
Garry Sigle at a track meet.
Garry Sigle at a track meet.
Garry Sigle upon his induction into the Kansas State High School Activities Association Hall of Fame.
Garry Sigle waving to the crowd at his induction into the Kansas State High School Activities Association Hall of Fame in May 2012.

*  *  *  *  *

Garry Sigle’s Riley County High School State Championship Teams:

1994 State Cross-Country Champion Team.
1994 State Cross-Country Champion Team.
1995 State Cross-Country  Championship Team.
1995 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
1996 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
1996 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
1997 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
1997 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
1998 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
1998 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
1998 State Track & Field Championship Team.
1998 State Track & Field Championship Team.
1999 State Track & Field Championship Team.
1999 State Track & Field Championship Team.
2000 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
2000 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
2005 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
2005 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
2006 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
2006 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
2007 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
2007 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
2009 State Cross-Country Championship Team.
2009 State Cross-Country Championship Team.

Lewis Hanback – 1996 Inductee

“In the summer of 1865, soon after the close of the Civil War, in which he had played a gallant part as a Union officer, Lewis Hanback came to Kansas to practice law.  For many years he was one of the eminent members of the Kansas bar, and he was also known and esteemed in public affairs.  He was one of the members of Kansas history during the latter half of the [nineteenth] century.” — Kansas and Kansans, 1919.

Lt. Lewis Hanback of the 27th Illinois Infantry during the Civil War.

Lewis Hanback was born March 27, 1839, in Winchester, Scott County, Illinois.  He was the oldest of six children by William and Ann Hanback.  His childhood was spent at Winchester and Madison, Indiana, after which the family moved to Quincy, Illinois.  The father, William, died there May 1, 1855, and his wife passed away the following March.  The family broke up after the parents’ death and the children became separated.  Lewis was seventeen when he went to work as a farm hand.  His education was not neglected.  He had previously attended the local school at Winchester and later he graduated from the Cherry Grove Seminary in Knox County, Illinois.  During the winter of 1860-61 he taught a term of country school.

Hanback enlistedApril 19, 1861, at Jacksonville, Illinois, when the Civil War began and the first call for troops came out.  He joined the “Harding Light Guards,” later Company B of the Tenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry.  When his term of three months ended Hanback re-enlisted in Company K of the 27th Illinois Infantry.  The same day Hanback was mustered in as orderly sergeant he participated in General Ulysses S. Grant’s attack on Belmont, Missouri.  Afterwards he was commissioned a second lieutenant of his company and promoted through the grades.  Hanback served with Grant in Kentucky and at the sieges of Island Number 10 and Corinth, Mississippi.  He then served on the staffs of Colonel G. W. Roberts, General C. G. Harker, and General L. P. Bradley, and took part in the battles at Stone River and Chickamauga and in the siege of Chattanooga.  Under General Phil Sheridan he served in the battle of Missionary Ridge.  Hanback reached the rank of captain when his enlistment time ended and he was mustered out September 20, 1864, at Springfield, Missouri.

After the war Hanback attended law school in Albany, New York, for a year.  On August 9, 1865, he married Hester Cooper of Chapin, Illinois.  Thirteen days later the couple moved to Topeka, Kansas, where Hanback was admitted to the Kansas bar and opened a law practice.  In 1867 he served as justice of the peace, then city attorney  and as Shawnee County Probate Judge from 1868 through 1872.  Lewis became Assistant Chief Clerk to the Kansas House of Representatives and later Assistant Secretary to the Kansas Senate.  In March 1878 Hanback was appointed Assistant U. S. District Attorney for Kansas.

While in Topeka the Hanbacks saw three of their children not live beyond infancy. Three other children lived to adulthood–Clara, Edwin, and Grace.  The family went to Salina, Kansas, in 1879 when Hanback was appointed Receiver for the United States Land Office there.  His formal entry into politics came in 1882 when he was elected to the at-large berth Kansas then had in the U.S. House of Representatives.  A Republican, he moved his family to Osborne in May 1883 and was re-elected to a second term the next year.

In 1887 Hanback was defeated and retired from active politics.  At Osborne he remained active in Masonic Lodge, Loyal Legion, and Grand Army of the Republic circles.  He turned down an 1889 offer to become editor of the Osborne County Farmer but instead continued in great demand as a speaker who could make an audience laugh or cry at his discretion.

 

“He spoke extemporaneously and his eloquence electrified his audiences on patriotic occasions . . . As a boy I once heard him rehearse a battle scene in which the late Governor Lyman U. Humphrey [of Kansas] carried the flag across a bloody terrain, the speech being a prelude to an introduction of Governor Humphrey to an audience.  When Hanback reached the climax every man in the room was standing on his chair shouting at the top of his voice.  It was the most exciting moment we have ever witnessed at a political meeting.

It didn’t last long after Humphrey began speaking.  He was a very poor speaker and dealt largely in statistics, with the result that his audience was soon peacefully sleeping.  Hanback as a word painter has had few equals in Kansas.  We shall not see his like again.” — Charles E. Mann, Osborne County Farmer, September 1914.

 

Lewis Hanback as U.S. Representative.

Hanback’s virtuosity with words served Osborne well.  Literary debates were the rage of the day and the rivalry between Osborne and Smith Center was intense.  In 1889 the Osborne Literary Society went to Smith Center for a much-anticipated debate.  Hanback, disguised and hidden, was suddenly introduced as the last Osborne speaker.  The Smith Center crowd cried foul and were in a somewhat riotous mood, but after Hanback finished speaking a roar of applause greeted his oration.  All was forgiven and the night ended peacefully.

In 1891 Hanback moved back to Topekaand resumed his law practice.  After a period as Adjutant General of Kansas he moved to the Kansas City suburb of Armourdale, Kansas, dealing in law and real estate.  His last public appearances were at the Ottawa (KS) Chautauqua and at Chetopa, Kansas, where he addressed a meeting of the GAR.  He contracted typhoid fever and two weeks later Lewis Hanback passed away at his home in Armourdale on September 6, 1897, shortly after he was named to Who’s Who in America.

Hanback was originally buried in the Armoudale Cemetery, but in 1910 a dispute arose over a proposal that he be buried elsewhere. Kansas City,Topeka,Wichita, and even Osborne all vied for the honor.  In the end Congressman Hanback was reburied in the Topeka Cemetery under a suitable monument next to his wife and three children.

Niles C. Endsley – 1997 Inductee

Niles C. Endsley was born in Alton, Kansas, November 10, 1889, the son of Henry and Emma (Austin) Endsley.  Niles grew up in Alton and attended school there; a highlight of his school days came when Alton played Beloit, a much larger school, in football.  Despite having only 15 players on their team, Alton soundly beat the visitors and the game is forever counted as one of the school’s greatest sporting achievements.   He finished three years of high school before he dropped out at the request of his father, who needed help with the family harness business.

Later Niles “slipped off” and attended a business college course at Kansas Wesleyan University in Salina, Kansas, to learn shorthand.  In 1908 his father came across a good buy in restaurant equipment and called on Niles to come home and run the new cafe.  A complete steak dinner cost 25 cents.  In 1913 he started a local photography studio while running the cafe, but times were too tough to make any money at it and he closed it down.  Five years later he returned to Kansas Wesleyan University and became the first graduate from that school in stenotype instruction.  Niles wanted to become a newspaper columnist, but instead went to work for the Independent Salt Company of Kanopolis, Kansas, using his stenotype and bookkeeping skills.

In 1916 Niles’ father’s health failed and he returned to Alton to take over the family farm a mile an a half northwest ofAlton.  On June 8, 1918, he married Margaret J. Herd in Alton.  They lived on six different farms until 1932, when he moved to live on the Frank and Mary Lewis farm (his aunt and uncle) where he lived the rest of his life.  His family consisted of one son, Lybran.

Niles was a hard working and honest man who was well thought of by all who knew him.  Some famous relatives that he was related to included Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Oliver “Hazard” Perry, who commanded the American navy on Lake Erie in the war of 1812. Niles enjoyed fishing and coin collecting and was a highly-regarded honey producer.  He established his first apiary in the 1930s, and at one time he had up to 37 bee swarms.  He also sold and raised popcorn for many years.  In 1949 he contracted meningitis and was confined to bed, and then bought his first-ever tractor so that his wife could carry on with the farmwork a little easier.

He was active in the Congregational Church inAlton, and later the United Methodist Church. Niles held several offices in the church and served as Sunday School superintendent, teacher and deacon during his over 50 years of membership, attending services regularly up to the day before he died.  He was a member of the Masonic Lodge for 65 years and of the Odd Fellow Lodge for 68 years, serving as secretary of that fraternity for 26 years. Niles held the office of Sumner Township clerk and he was also co-founded the Osborne County Farm Bureau and was a past county president of the organization.

In 1899 Niles began writing poetry.  Fifty-three years later he began writing poems seriously and his talent in this field was widely recognized.  He was a member of the Kansas Authors Club and in 1973 he published Echoes From the Valley, a compilation of his best work.  Niles was an authority on historical lore in the area and he was often called upon to locate forgotten graves and to settle disputes concerning the events of the past.  In 1970 he compiled The History of Bull City-Alton: 1870-1970 in recognition of the town’s centennial and on September 9th of that year Niles was honored as the Grand Marshal of the Alton Centennial Parade and Celebration. He passed away September 3, 1979, inAlton, and was laid to rest in the Sumner Cemetery.